Posts Tagged as: web-development

July 18, 2016

Rockstar Developers

For the last few months I’ve been leading games product development at Hearst Digital Media working with some amazing folks building some pretty awesome stuff. We’re bullish on using the latest web technologies to bring app-like game functionality onto the web, and it’s been a blast so far.

We’ve just signed a deal with a big gaming company (can’t say who yet… but you’ve heard of them), and with wind in our sails we’re expanding the team. If you’re a rockstar full-stack developer or know one, check out the job description here.

August 21, 2015

Interactive Subway Station Maps

I’ve been having way too much fun with these. Last week I made an interactive sharable NYC subway map called “What’s Your Subway Station Number” and it’s been making its way around the web, being covered by Gothamist, Curbed, Brooklyn Magazine, 6sqft, and more.

And yesterday I made one for Boston, which you can see here. just did a nice writeup, and I’m hoping it brings Bostonians as much fun (and lost workplace productivity) as it’s brought New Yorkers.

Based on the stats, people have spent a combined 370,000 hours playing with just the NYC map alone. Crazy!

September 19, 2014

Can Eye Axe Ewe Equestrian


I made this with icons from my one of my favorite online resources, The Noun Project.


Can designed by Deuk from the Noun Project
Eye designed by Edward Boatman from the Noun Project
Axe designed by George T Hayes from the Noun Project
Sheep designed by Unrecognized MJ from the Noun Project
Jockey designed by Jerry Wang from the Noun Project

May 5, 2014


As far as I can tell, there’s no word for that thing when a website links a few consecutive words of text. For example, if I was talking about Charlie Sheen I might mention he’s a had some trouble with the law. (See what I did there?)

So I’d like to formally submit my term, “Chainlinking”:

Chainlinking. When a website hyperlinks a few consecutive words, usually to provide background on a topic. Often snarky. Usually annoying.

Lastly, I should add that there’s another definition for chainlinking on Urban Dictionary. My definition is decidedly different, and has nothing to do with a bunch of dudes blowing each other.

April 4, 2014

Embedding Posts from Bitcoin Megaphone

I just added a cool new feature to Bitcoin Megaphone. Now, each post’s permalink has an “embed” button, which lets you embed that post anywhere on the web.

This opens up the content to anyone who wants to categorize it or share it in new and creative ways. Enjoy!

While we’re on the topic, here are some of my favorite posts so far.

March 19, 2014

Bitcoin Megaphone

Last week I had a crazy idea for a website. This week I’m proud to announce Let me explain the idea and why I’m so excited about it.

The website is based on two basic rules: Anyone can post, and anyone can profit.

Rule 1: Anyone can post

In this regard it’s like Twitter, but instead of being limited to 140 characters, you’re charged per character. So the only limit to the size of a post is the size of your wallet.

If you wanted to post a message the length of a tweet (140 characters), it would cost around $0.08 (based on the current Bitcoin/USD exchange). Posting just a URL costs around a penny. If you want to stand out and post a chunk of text, the price (along with the post’s visibility) goes up.

So that’s the first part of the website. It’s got kind of a “Million Dollar Homepage” vibe to it. Ok, so far so good.

Rule 2: Anyone can profit

This is where things get interesting.

Every time someone creates a post, a “virtual tipjar” is automatically generated for that post. Each post has its own unique tip jar, and it’s baked right into each post’s URL. And here’s the kicker – only the original creator of the post is given the keys to the tip jar. This is possible thanks to the ingenious system of public/private key generation that’s a part of the Bitcoin system. So any time you see a post on Bitcoin Megaphone, you can send money to it and the author gets 100%.

This lets people get a return on their investment, and offers incentive to post and share funny, engaging, or timely content. Getting social currency in actual money is much more enticing than the meaningless Retweets and Likes we’re all so obsessed with.

There’s already a post that cost $15 where someone jokingly referenced the infamous Nigerian Prince scam email. It hasn’t gotten any tips yet, but I applaud the author’s balls:

On the opposite end of the spectrum, here’s a post where the author only spent $0.08, but has already made $0.40 in tips, making about 4x his/her investment. (It’s a cute emoticon, by the way):

Why I’m Stoked

Before Bitcoin, it would have been impossible to create a website like this. There are no credit cards to hook up, no user accounts to create and spam with marketing emails; no annoying ads that disrupt the experience of exploration and discovery; no annoying comments to moderate. It’s just content and micropayments.

There are a lot of smart and talented people looking at micropayments as the future of online publishing. Personally, I have no idea how things will shake out, but I’m excited to keep watching this living breathing ecosystem evolve.

In Summary

Right now on the internet, text is a commodity (think of those walls of text on your crazy friend’s Facebook page). Bitcoin Megaphone transforms strings of text from a commodity to a unique store of value. And that’s some pretty interesting shit.

PS – I was considering posting this entire post on Bitcoin Megaphone for $21.30, but decided it would be weird on launch day :-p

February 12, 2014

Javascript “World” Simulation

This is brilliant. View the source to see what’s happening.

November 20, 2013

Amazing Fluid Particle Simulator

I just love things like this.

There are a ton more links to other simulations and visualizations in this Hacker News thread.

October 8, 2013

Great Parallax Website

This Danny Brown story by Complex Magazine is really well done.

This feels like the forefront of online publishing to me. My spidey-sense tells me that if it looks amazing and is very difficult to build, you’re doing it right; very similar to how painstaking it was to lay out a magazine in the 1950s.

October 3, 2013

Cool Interactive Cloth Simulation

All done with basic web technologies. Very cool.

See the Pen Tear-able Cloth by suffick (@stuffit) on CodePen

Via The Loop